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Farafoot Bushcraft and Survival Blog

Farafoot Bushcraft and Survival Blog

We at Farafoot have always have a fascination with the whole aspect of bushcraft and survival. In many ways it is a completely different way of life and as such we are constantly learning and therefore we hope to provide some small snippets of information and learning about techniques, skills and knowledge. However bushcraft and survival is not about 'tricks' and short cuts, but much more about changing the way we interact with our natural environment so that we no longer see this kind of life as 'outdoor activity' but as an new way of living. One phrase that always comes to mind is: "A walk in the woods will never be the same again".


Sleeping Bags

Sleeping Bags

Sleeping bags and bushcraft camps obviously to go together, since essentially bushcraft is a master class in the art of camping without a modern shelter, where there is less room for error and getting it wrong could lead to a very uncomfortable night in your handmade bushcraft shelter. Many people who attend Farafoot’s bushcraft overnight camps or weekend bushcraft camps, usually ask two questions, what do I need to bring with me to eat and what kind of sleeping bag do I need?

Mushrooms and Fungi as Food

Mushrooms and Fungi as Food

In what way are mushrooms an important source of food and do they have a relevance beyond simply interesting culinary additions to our diet. My interest here is whether mushrooms are a useful food source in survival situations or when humans live from the land.

Foraging: An Introduction to the Hunting and Gathering skills of Hunter/Gathers

Foraging: An Introduction to the Hunting and Gathering skills of Hunter/Gathers

Foraging is one of those bushcraft skills that you grow to love. However I’ve run foraging courses during our Farafoot bushcraft days where people have literally moved away from me as I’ve picked something to eat, as if it might be infectious. It is true that to our sugar-addicted taste buds, the taste experience from foraged wild food can difficult to accept at first, particularly with the bitter tastes that are commonly found in wild food. An example I give is the Pheasant Berry, the berry from which to most people tastes pleasantly like burnt caramel, but to some tastes absolutely disgusting – sometimes I think because their brains have already decided that they are about to be poisoned.